10
Mar 10

Developer Tools in Firefox

jk5854/flickr cc

Web developers make the open web go.

For Mozilla, that means that if we want to see the open web succeed, we need to help web developers build it. When we talk to them about building for the web, most of what they want to talk about is web featuresCSS improvements, new HTML5 goodness, content magic like geolocation and orientation events. We invest a lot in making those things awesome, but they are only part of the answer.

The other thing that web developers talk about is tools. Specifically, when we talk to them about tools they ask for two things:

  1. Mozilla should invest in Firebug. The Firebug and Firefox communities should be working together to fix bugs, not working around them. Firefox releases should ship with a compatible Firebug out of the gate, not weeks or months later.
  2. Mozilla should be leading in developer tools. Before Firebug, View Source and DOM Inspector were the state of the art. Now other browsers are copying Firebug and shipping their tools by default, and the question is where the tools are going to go next. We should be a strong voice there, and back it up with code.

For #1: got it. Loud and clear. Firefox 3.6 shipped with a compatible Firebug from day 1, due in no small part to the contributions of Mozilla employees paid to work on Firebug. Jan “Honza” Odvarko has been fixing bugs and building out features left and right, and Rob Campbell has helped drive the project, and made sure that Firefox dependencies get attention. We don’t want to try to take Firebug over; it has its own, healthy community. We are much more active participants than we used to be, though.

#2 is harder. What tools do web developers need that don’t yet exist? Which tools would be broadly useful, and which ones niche? What can Mozilla bring to the table, as the developer of a browser, to make the design & development experience better/easier/faster/funner? We’re trying to figure that out, we’re working on some early ideas that I’ll write about in subsequent posts, but I’d also like to hear what you think is missing.

Building developer tools into Firefox will mean a lot of exploration, and a lot of new code – that’s scary, but the benefits are huge. In the short term, this work will rekindle the conversation about developer tools, and get us all thinking outside of the existing boxes for a few minutes. In the long term, it should make life better for web devs and tool authors; everybody wins.

Web devs are smart, it’s no coincidence that #1 and #2 above pull in the same direction: make Firefox the best platform for web development and tool building. We all want web authors to have an awesome, empowered experience and I think working together in this way is the best play we have for continuing to build that.